Excuses are for losers

Ninety-nine percent of the failures comes from people who have the habit of making excuses. – George W. Carve

Ok harsh, but certainly fair. I can absolutely accept a person failing as a result of trying their hardest and exhausting all possible avenues BUT what drives me mad is when people accept failure…..defeat before even giving it a go. How crazy is that?

If you find yourself making a lot of excuses, rather than just getting on with your goals, be brutally honest with yourself by asking whether you are merely avoiding the “too hard” basket of tasks needing to be done? Which resulted in excuses after excuses. If this is the case, you are probably allowing self-doubt to creep in and take over your mindset. Or, you might need a good kick up the backside to get you back on track!

Take control of your confidence and kick self-doubt in the guts with some positive self-talk in order to stay on track. Reassurance is critical, along with surrounding yourself with positive and encouraging people such as a mentor. The main takeaway is that you need to do the WORK as excuses are for losers.

What gets measured gets done….or does it really?

Certainly at an individual level, if you are passionate about the initiative/goal, yes absolutely… BUT….what if you are merely reporting to tick the box? Organisations are well known for making their staff inflate reports to appear better than they are for the sake of public perception.

A great example being the hot topic of gender diversity, having more women in senior/executive positions. Do we really need the government to mandate reporting in order for it to be taken seriously? Anything that is forced rather than engaged, is far from sustainable (productive). Informing and educating, builds a following, resulting in greater impact, through demonstrated action.

My take, if it’s an engrained habit, it’s demonstrated in all that you do and therefore does not require special attention. Informing and educating is key rather than creating all this hype around the need for more measures, to prove you are doing the right things on the surface. What really matters, is walking your talk each and every day, advocating your cause rather than showing off in an annual report.

First impressions – why bother?

Whether it’s your personal brand or business, leaders that invest time and money in training their staff to provide superior customer service (value proposition), will place a heavy focus on ensuring their staff deliver such services with absolute confidence. The first step in this process, is to nail the first impression! Do this well (consistently) and the customer will keep coming back. Why, because confident staff, are empowered, energised and enthusiastic to do their very best, more importantly they will make it happen!

Pushing the consumer privacy boundaries

Not one to shy away from getting value for money, I put the top 5 car insurance providers to the test last week. What dawned on me was the amount of information (PERSONAL information) these insurers were demanding before we even got to any questions about the car (yes I made it clear I was shopping around for the best deal) not signing my life away….just yet.

What struck me was the deliberate misleading by Youi insurance which started with Get a quote now on their website. I never got a quote…instead I got a reply saying thank you for your enquiry, one of our representatives will be in contact with you shortly.

The next day a Youi representative rang me and proceeded with an alarming number of personal questions, which in my mind were invasive and inappropriately pitched so say the least. Thirty minutes into the quotation and after just about giving away my entire life story, I finally got the ball park figure for the insurance premium, which was less than desirable.

I felt as though I walked away with nothing and the insurance provider walked away with all this personal information about me. Sure there are privacy laws in Australia, but where’s the guarantee I won’t be contacted in the future, by this insurance provider, even though I’d asked them to destroy all my personal information.

This experience forced me reassess future dealings with service providers and the level of control I have in disclosing my personal information. Namely, a reminder to thyself that I have the power to divulge the level of information I am comfortable with and not the other way around. Service providers can request all the information in the world but it’s up to the consumers to draw the line in the sand and say no if they feel the questions are plainly inappropriate or unwarranted.

Do you feel like your privacy boundaries have been pushed by service providers beyond your comfort? How have you dealt with the situation?