Self-entitled with zero empathy

Having witnessed more than my fair share of self-entitlement from senior executives this particular director took it to another level……in fact she took the cake and the crown for her over the top self-entitled behaviour.

This director took the time to give me a lecture (boarder line verbal abuse) on how her time was extremely important. She went on to say she was not interested in appointments unless they were mid-morning and how dare I offend her with a request for a breakfast meeting at 8:00am. She reminded me that she was director and everyone needed to dance around her. Her time was precious, it was all about her. Can you believe this? A Board member responsible for making the million dollar decisions which affects thousands of employees did not have a humble bone in her body. She was not prepared to budge or be flexible, requested a certain five star restaurant, the list went on and on.

I was appalled to say the least but the sad truth is that this is happening all around me and I find myself fighting for others who are unable to deal with such awful, rude leaders who lack compassion and continuously belittle and intimidate those around them. This particular director didn’t stop for a second to think about nor empathise with me, she was so consumed with self-entitlement she could not move past her demeaning and inconsiderate ways. Rather than saying no sorry my schedule cannot accommodate a breakfast meeting could you please offer me another time, she had to go down the path of self-righteousness.

This director was clearly all for a work life balance when it came to her needs yet failed to reciprocate and share that compassionate, empathetic view towards me. In fact she failed to acknowledge me period. I was someone who was disrupting her walk in the park. How dare I.

Don’t get me wrong I’m no stranger to self-entitled senior executive behaviour and I’ve had my quota of office politics spanning 18 year but what is seriously starting to affect me on a human level is this lack of empathy and complete self-entitlement with no regard for others. This behaviour needs to stop. We need to start calling out such behaviour as it’s disgusting and far from the role models we are looking to lead our future generation.

How to develop a role model in your child

Like any other 15 year old teenager, my one has had her fair share of good and bad decision-making. Whether these were influenced by peer pressure or a lack of balanced judgment is irrelevant as we all have choices and the choices we make shape our destiny. We can teach our children right from wrong but ultimately wrapping them up in cotton wool isn’t going to teach them the survival skills required to take on the world. Whilst we are there to guide them, they need to learn how to make their own decisions whether good or bad and understand the consequences in order to grow into responsible adults.

What is important however is the need to be continuously present in our children’s lives in order to share the lessons regardless of a good or bad experience encountered. This requires regular conversations with our children to check-in and understand their current challenges/pressures on both a personal and professional level. It’s not about never-ending lectures on how they could have done things better but more about letting our children open up and share their reasoning for doing so in a trusting and non-judgmental environment.

In order to improve relationships with our children, I believe parents and teachers must take accountability for regularly checking in with teachers to see how our children are progressing and offering support where needed. Parents cannot rely on teachers alone to ensure their children are on the right track nor can teachers expect the parents to know whether their child is struggling or not until they read the school report. By taking ownership and accountability together parents and teachers are more likely to develop well-mannered and considerate role models in our society as we demonstrate kindness, consideration and willingness to support each other regardless of the circumstances.